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to the imperial interest of india. the southern coast of the gulf was called the piru coast. constantly feuding tribes would feud with one another spilling out of the seaboard approach to in the and resulted in the tax on india. so the british found themselves pooled into the gulf during the 1800's. not to colonize it to maintain order. they did with the relatively small amount of military force. but you are right. up through the early 1870's was one of british hegemonic control over the persian golf. the aftermath of rope or two with the independence of india that the british brigade at -- began their retrenchment with the independence of india, the british lost the rationale for their military presence and their lost the money to pay for their presence there. >>host: did the americans step in because of the vacuum or because they were asked? >> the story of british control shepherding over the golf plays itself out over 20 years. in 1968 the british announced the impending withdrawal in three years the americans initially said in very it explicit terms will not replace the british. the januar
to provide order to a part of -- on the flanks to their imperial interests in india. the southern coast of the gulf had been called in the 1800s, the pirate coast, and the constantly feuding tribes fused with one another, which spill out into the sea-born approaches to india, and result in attacks on india, and possibly resulting weakness that might bring another great power. so the british found themselves pulled into the gulf in the 1800s. not to colonize as they did further to the east in india but, rather to maintain order there, and they did, with a relatively small amount of military force. but you're right, the story in the 1800s, and the 1900s, until the early 1970s, was one of british control over the persian gulf. and it was in the aftermath of world war world car -- world war ii, the british began their slow, prolonged entrend. in the gulf. with the independence of india in the late 1940s, the british lost the rationale for the military presence in the gulf, and they lost to a degree the money to pay for the military presence that maintained order for so long. >> host: did th
it because you got cheaper energy. that's theth way forward. also, for china and india and everyone else. melissa: proponents of solar and wind don't want to hear is while fracking has been profitable, it's helped the environment, but at the same time, you look at things, like, a big story from w wyoming, why theyh drill, anddrl there's a well that is contaminated one way or the other, and seems like in the repos dealing with this and the neighbors in the neighborhood are saying, and s this is pavilion, wyoming, it's, a result of theracking nearby, and that's a case they pointo that it's bad for the environment. >> nothing is just fin.. fracking has problems. we have to have it well-reellated. people don't know the water you get is from 100 feet down and fracking is, like, a mile down of the it's not like the two are intersecting, but you drop thet drill down in the water.insu you need regulation. melissa: right.ight >> you also got to recognize if you care about global warming and cheap energy prices, and if you care about energy indpensz, this is a great opportunity.e melissa: people i
explained that she was returning to india in a few days and hope to catch a glance of the president before she went home. she then arranged for the woman to be given a seat at the dinner so that she could hear the speech as well as see the president. nixon then left the hall to continue on to the engagement. i used the story because i think it exemplifies several key points i wish to make about pat and her public role. particularly about the role of foreign diplomats. first, she met the woman during one of her travels as first lady. the traveling she did as first and second lady was the best part of her job. as a political wife. second, she was just a young woman who had come to the united states and had come out to see the second lady and see the united states to study. she treated everyone she met as though they were the most important person in the world. there, she was happiest in her role when she could take action. the party they were out in the engagement they were going to or not is important at that moment as getting this visitor from india a seat at the presidential dinner. in th
to india tolet caribbean and various place us to get a procedure because it was done well and cheaper. and so it can happen here. we need a free market system with competition to prove at, that's all. >> it seems like that is one thing we do differently here than other countris and that is having more competition. tort reform not so much. but competition. >> i come from a count reap where the country is the government who are forcing all of the prices down. you need competition. fundmentally americans are paying too much and they are suffering. >> go out in new york and shop a knee replacement. you will find the bill all over the charts is no transparency in the hospital. you force them to be transparent. >> still doctors out there to beef up want bill to cover other costs including malpractice surance. which is why we need tort reform. >> and you are telling me aspirin doesn't cost ever upon you? buy a home in america you can get automatic citizenship. get automatic citizenship. we debate and you decide. can i help you? i heard you guys can ship ground for less than the ups store. th
of gold in their collective pockets. but they're not alone. china look set to overtake india as the world's top gold consumer this year. meanwhile, china's icbc bank says that within an economy on the mend, rising domestic income and new gold linked investment products in the offing, china's potential as a global gold haven is huge. even the pboc appears to be in on the act. the london bouillon market association says beijing may be mulling options to tack on more gold to its reserves soon. >> joining us now from hong kong, martin henekyp what is the diwali effect for gold and gold prices? >> demand has been quite reasonable as was mentioned despite the relatively weak indian economy and weak rupee. but you can't blame them if the rupee is very weak, what would you do if you don't have trust in the currency going forward. and we just had actually the indianville production figures out, they were weaker than expected, actually down for september 0.4%. negatively an expectation of 2.8%. and at the same time, the consumer prices rose by 9.75%. so somewhat of a stagflation there, but the econ
at and the engagement they were going were not as important at that moment as getting this visitor from india a seat at the presidential dinner. the greater scheme of things it's a small act but it left a lasting impression on the woman involved. the indian woman involved and on the women in the table that she was eventually seated at. that's how we know about the event. through a letter that someone who she ended up sitting with responded and wrote to pat later about it. for pat politics was her job. one she didn't always enjoy. while on occasion she was proud of the work and helping to raise funds for the party. she found many of the tasks frustrating and mind numbing. by the end of the first term she expressed the friends reentry to the work force. she wrote i would like to do part-time work rather than the useless work i'm expected to do. the thrill of meeting famous men and women and the glamour of white tie dinners wore off leaving only the tiring routine of constant evenings away from the girls, ielgd chatter with women she didn't always like. for someone that worked hard her entire life, she
was returning to india in a few days and hope to catch a glimpse of the president before she went home. have been arranged for the woman to be given a seat at the dinner so she could hear the speech as well as see the president. nixon then left the hall to continue on to the previous engagement. i use this story to begin my topic because i think it exemplifies several key points i wish to make about pat nixon public role. more particularly as foreign diplomat. patton at the indian woman during one of her travels the second lady. the traveling she did as first and second lady was the best part of her job as a political wife. second, this is not the wife of ambassador or statesmen. she was just a young woman who had come to the united states and then had come to the united states to study. pat didn't limit her contact server trouble to import people. she treated everyone she met as if they were the most important person in the world. the people she met sinister sincerity and responded to it. third, she was happiest in her will when she could take action. the party of the nixon's in the engagem
animals and jungle and things i suppose from africa or perhaps india, but a lot of animals in it. as to get closer to the pieces, you realize that these are actually coutoure pieces. it is as though you have tamed the jungle. there is the extraordinary leopard dress that tells you where the coutoure are and how many hours of workmanship are in there. so when you pay the bill, perhaps it is justified. [laughter] there is one that was 1,032 hours of hand or again beating. they're very few designers i can think of in coutoure who would do something like that. we were used to seeing coutoure very much what i would call salon clothing, a very beautiful and very delicate, but not with the sentence animal, vegetable, natural being brought into coutoure. was doing coutoure for use something that you wanted to make coutoure different are doing it -- did it make you different as a designer? >> it is difficult to answer that question. maybe for me, i did not go to fashion school. i learned through looking what was about fashion in tv. at that time, it was only coutoure. and ready to wear. i
should get education because education is so important. >> reporter: across the border in india, prayers for malala's recovery. in england where she's being treated supporters lit candles in her name. >> we can vote for her to win the nobel peace prize to make her cause even greater. >> reporter: a cause picked up in the months after she was shot in the head for publically campaigning for education rights. on a visit to pakistan u.n. education envoy gordon brown presented a petition with a million signatures calling for education for all. malala, he said, has become a beacon of hope. >> people who were previously silent and said nothing are now saying we cannot allow this to happen. we are going to change this. >> reporter: doctors are preparing for her next surgery, but they say she continues to make remarkable recovery. this week her hospital in birmingham released a new video documenting the recovery with malala reading some of the cards and thousands of messages from around the world. >> i'm thankful -- >> reporter: her father spoke in a video on her behalf. >> she wants me to tell e
to africa, indonesia, the gulf, china, india, brazil, japan, and malaysia. the late lord mayor has been doing the same, visiting no fewer than 26 countries during his year in office. now i know there are some people who say this is not real foreign-policy, or worse still, it is just loading policy. i believe there is a race to when britain and leading from the front. i make no apology from linking britain to the fastest-growing parts of the world. i am proud of the fact that in just two years british exports of goods to brazil are up 25%, up 40%, russia up 80%. last week we took steps towards a new defense partnership with united arab emirate that could be worth more than 6 billion pounds to british industry. i want us to go further still. when i look around the world, i see countries like germany using overseas business that works to drive new business. in brazil, for example, 1700 members of the german chamber. 1700 members of the u.s. chamber's. how many does the u.k. have? just 240. we need to do all whole lot better than that. i have asked steven green, our trade minister to work a
with a stable outlook for india. the agency mentioned a list of positives including india's high savings and investment rates, large diverse economy, but moody's did warn of credit challenges posed by india's weak infrastructure, high government debt and inflation. also under pressure partly due you to the country's strong reliance on imported crude. india is the world's fourthimpo may be some relief in sight. cnbc has more on the story live from new delhi. >> so this is a really big asset when talking about the field. field one will be producing 400,000 barrels a day. phase two producing 1 million barrels of oil every day. and conoco phillips announced an agreement for the $5 billion deal, but i would like to point out this deal is far from done. there are plenty of consortium partners when you're talking about it. for example shell, exxonmobile, all holding a a little over 16%. it will require all consortium partners. become when bp wanted to exit, in the end actually bought the stake, so we'll have to perhaps see a lot of work being done by conoco phillips to convince the partners to
of was something else. what was going in india at that time was not an islamic buddy in the. one important aspect of that was to raise the issue of authenticity. what was an authentic indian, anti-odds was only the hand experience of india was authentically indian. and what that meant was all the minorities was the largest minority among the minority. were in some way an authentic. i found that very annoying. and so i thought i would take a very small minority, which is a south indian jewish community. and then create an even smaller minority by having somebody from that community mary into a south indian catholic family, thus creating a catholic-a jewish individuals probably a minority of one person in a country of a billion people. and then show that you could actually grow the whole experience of india out of that one person. you know, so that everybody in indian is authentically indian. that's what it wanted to say. and not just any particular devotional group. [applause] >> i mean, the novel came out of that desire to rescue what it was to an indian from the logic of this kind of attack. >>
. analysts say the data shows china's growth slowdown may be bottoming out. over to india now where the picture is more clear. service sector growth slowed down in october to its slowest in six months. europe's recession and america's sluggish economy played a large role in cutting demand for india's services. the sector makes up 60% of the country's economic output. >> ministers and central bankers are meeting in mexico day one of the summit saw a focus in the debt woes and weighing's fiscal cliff. ministers pushed the u.s. to act decisively to solve the debt ceiling impasse calling it the biggest short term threat to global growth. also a key week for greece. today the government will present either new austerity package to parliament. yesterday they warned the country would be forced out unless the new spending cuts are passed. >> the european central bank is investigating whether they've broken their own lending rules. the central bank may have accepted t-bills as collateral that was ineligible. that means those banks may have to find a further 16 billion euros to put up as what
'm from france. >> i was born in venezuela. >> south africa. >> hait. >> india. >> i'm from philippines. >> i'm from guinea, west africa. >> senegal. >> just like from many of our ancestors the road here has been long and the americans to become those americans has been recorded in decades, not years. >> 10 years ago. >> 12 years ago. >> 4 years ago. >> 20 years next month. >> i've lived here basically my whole life. >> 24 years. >> but wait they do to find their own american dream, each one deeply personal. >> my american dream is to become a fire fighter. >> my daughter at the school. >> my american dream has to become an american. >> to create my own leg. >> i to be a successful woman. >> to pursue the happiness. >> today that's my american dream. >> right now it means that eventually i'm going to get to vote. >> my american dream is to buy a house in maine. >> you don't have to become like a billionaire. it can be your own business. it can be your own dream. >> learning how democracy works. >> taking part in the rights i'm helping to defend. >> each story unique, but one word the sa
with opportunities. india, china, brazil, ishares, small-caps, large-caps, ishares. industrials. low cost. every dollar counts. ishares. income. dividends. bonds. i like bonds. ishares. commodities. diversification. choices. my own ideas. ishares. i want to use the same stuff the big guys use. ishares. 9 out of 10 large, professional investors choose ishares for their etfs. introducing the ishares core, etfs for the heart of your portfolio. tax efficient and low cost building blocks to help you keep more of what you earn. call your advisor. visit ishares.com. ishares. yeah, ishares. ishares by blackrock. call 1-800-ishares for a prospectus which includes investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses. read and consider it carefully before investing. >>> welcome back. 45 minutes past the hour now. the anglican church is getting a new leader. justin well by will be facing significant challenges. more to tell us about the new leader and what he'll be facing as the symbolic head is nadia bilchik. good morning. >> good morning. >> let's talk about the anglican church. how many? >> there are aroun
is getting this visitor from india a seat at the. in the greater scheme of things, it's really a small act, but it left a lasting impression on indian woman involved in women at the table that she was eventually seated at. the how we actually know about the event when she ended up sitting with responded and wrote later about it. politics is their job and when she didn't always enjoy. one occasion she was proud of her work in helping to a sense for the party, she found many frustrating and mindnumbing. by the end of the first term she expressed her jealousy of her friends reentry into the workforce. she will come out with a to do part-time work rather than all the useless gapping and expected to do. meeting famous men and women and claim our dinners at the white house not only 13 of constant away from chatter with him and she didn't always like. for someone who had worked her entire life and she had worked hard her entire list from the situation good times be intolerable. it was not the physical charges await her down. she resented not been useful, not to us a meaningful. perhaps that is wh
. dozens of missiles seen exploding in gaza. authorities in india have investigating claims a that walmart violated exchange rules. direct ownership by foreign firms was prohibited. walmart has denied any wrong doing. and the news comes a day after walmart reported disappointing quarterly sales. there is an original probe in mexico. and finally japan dissolved lower house for a december 16th election. the nikkei rallied more than 2% as investors bet the main opposition party will lynn the election. the party's leader has voied to put pressure to ease monetary currency. mr. kernen, welcome back. >> 25 2not even 24 hours, but is a wallop. it was something. >> we have to go back years to the last time you called in sick. >> how much do i want to share? >> none. >> the one thing i can tell you, it's been 25 years since regurgitating without alcohol i would say. >> how is that possible? how did you go 25 years? >> adults really don't get sick and throw up without alcohol. >> i did over the summer. when you're a little around kids, though -- >> food poisoning maybe. >> i've done it twice in the
poor people in china and india into the middle class and one american drops out of the middle class, that is not such a bad trade, 4-1. i spoke to a cfo of a u.s. technology company and this is a person with a charming and lovely life story, his parents were immigrants and he told me his parents told him and his brother when they immigrated that they were temporarily for. imagine that, temporarily poor and sure enough complete rock stars, both of them went to new york. and the mass club, one brother in silicon valley and another is derivative on wall street. the technology cfo, his parents were really angry at him because he dropped out of a ph.d. program in applied math at stanford having gone to harvard to start becoming plutocrats. very hard-working guy, did smart, did great, this is what he said about the american middle-class. we are demand higher paycheck than the rest of the world. if you are going to demand ten times the paycheck you need to deliver ten times the value. it sounds harsh but maybe people of the middle-class need to decide to take a pay cut. similarly, less for
on his reelection. but one man in india has a really special tribute. he created a 7-foot-high sand sculpture today in the president's honor. i don't know. it's on a beach near the city of paree. i don't know. the american flag is there, that's good. washington, d.c. skyline, that's very cool. i don't know about that thing. >> not a great reflection. >> it took him several hours to finish. maybe they ought to take several more hours and go back and work that out a little bit more. but anyway, nice effort. a nice tribute. >>
there were in india last year? there was one in 2011. there have been zero since that time. we are down to three countries that have polio. that is one of the works of the gates foundation. bill is going to come out and talk for a few moments on another passion of his, which is u.s. education. he will speak here for a few moments. then we have asked david leonhardt, who is the bureau chief of "the new york times" if he will come and join bill up here on our stage and continue with an interview for a few moments. i spoke to david it ahead of time and asked him if he would do this interview. david is a pulitzer prize winner. he asked -- is there was a gates prize? i said -- no, there is not a gates price, david. i hope i didn't take too big a liberty here. in asking in to come, i have committed on behalf of the gates foundation -- when there is a gates prize, that david leonhardt will be the first recipient. [laughter] let me present bill gates. [applause] >> thank you. good afternoon. i want to talk a bit about higher education. the reason i picked that is because i think it has been a h
on a bachelor of science degree, if you're born in india, you're facing a 70-year wait, and yet this bill will not allow the traditional policy of having visas trickle down when they are unused. that's not the way the immigration system works. i believe the only reason the bill was written in this fashion is to satisfy anti-immigrant organizations who have long lobbied for reduced levels of legal immigration. in an attempt to appear more pro-immigrant, they point to a family friendly provision, but looks can be deceiving. currently a lack of green card means that a category of family-based immigrants, the spouses and minor children of u.s. permanent residents, have to wait about two years overseas before they can rejoin their families. instead of providing critical green cards to these nuclear families, the stem bill offers temporary v visas with three significant captions. the family members must spend one year overseas. unlike the original v visa created by a republican congress in 2000, the new visas prohibit family members already here from participating. and unlike the original v vis
they are actually competing with kids in china and india. we must bring our standards up. i talked about career education. why have we stigmatized vocational education. there are kids who do not want to go to harvard. this should be in industries certification in a career like that. all these things matter. i will conclude by saying this frustration out there is real. from some people on my son of the aisle -- so many people on my side of the aisle, i have heard people say things i will mica in baltimore. i will focus on my family and community and the politics to others. others have suggested the american electorate has changed. i cannot believe that is true. i cannot believe that is true. if it is true, the very nature of our country has changed forever. that cannot happen. i cannot believe that is true. i the most are like my parents. all the what is a job that pays them enough money so they can buy a house, take their kids on a trip every once in awhile, do something they enjoyed in life, and leave their kids better off than themselves. the problem is those jobs are not being created as fas
, but stop a repeat of her tragic death. savita's husband is back with her family in india. all coming to terms with their loss of a wife, of a dar, of a first grandchild. a death everyone here hopes won't be in vein, that it will lead to a change in the irish abortion law. nick roberson, cnn, london. >>> this is an unusual sight for jordan. check this out. we're talking about hundreds taking to the streets shouting slogans against their king. we'll have a live report. anncr: some politicians seem to think medicare and... social security are just numbers in a budget. well, we worked hard for those benefits. we earned them. and if washington tries to cram decisions about the future... of these programs into a last minute budget deal... we'll all pay the price. aarp is fighting to protect seniors with responsible... solutions that strengthen medicare and... social security for generations to come. we can do better than a last minute deal... that would hurt all of us. >> jordan has been one of those stable nations, but protesters are now out in force. they want their government now to lis
tragic death may be lost too. >> some key information is missing. >> reporter: they met in india, married then set up home in ireland four years ago. he is an engineer. she was a dentist. they were happy here. >> she loved dancing. she forced me to dance with her a couple of times on the stage. we gave a performance. never have i gone on stage or i never had. i always had stage fear to go to speak out and the belief she gave me. it was unbelievable. >> reporter: together they had dreams of a beautiful future, of children, their children, of having a family. >> she was looking forward basically. in a way she found that she is at the right place. that's the reason why. she knew and she was very well organized as well. she knew what she wanted in life. so that's the reason why she had decided to settle here on the long-term. >> reporter: when she became pregnant, they were overjoyed. then their ordeal began. she got back pain. here at the university hospital doctors told her she was miscarrying. her baby would likely die. her husband says they asked for a termination and were told this is a
with that and the regulators are the same is true in europe and china and india. same is the same is true and brazil. this country deals with gaps between the rich and poor, agriculture, and earthen industrialize an evolving in much the same way that we're going to have to on the global stage for a the problem has been solved and can be solved. >> host: good afternoon, we have a caller from new york city. >> caller: hello, i'm so happy you're taking my call. my question is this fiscal cliff that we are approaching. if president obama allows it to happen, what kind of catastrophe are you talking about? i'm kind of concerned? so negatively will this affect the industry? how bad will it really be out there on wall street and main street? >> guest: well, let's say there are a bunch of people where the congress is involved, democrats and republicans have a role to play in whether we resolve this or not. the fact that we litigate to this extent, we are leaving the american people what the risks exposed with the fiscal squibb on time, it wants be outraged that it's generated. the fiscal cliff is a problem.
in mississippi and alabama when they are actually competing with kids in china and india. we must bring our standards up. i talked about career education. more heavy stigmatized of vocational education? there are -- why haev we stigmatized of vocational education. there are kids who do not want to go to harvard. this should be in industries certification in a career like that. all these things matter. i will conclude by saying this frustration out there is real. from some people on my son of the aisle -- so many people on my side of the aisle, i have heard people say things i will mica in baltimore. i will focus on my family and community and the politics to others. others have suggested the american electorate has changed. i cannot believe that is true. i cannot believe that is true. if it is true, the very nature of our country has changed forever. that cannot happen. i cannot believe that is true. i the most are like my parents. all the what is a job that pays them enough money so they can buy a house, take their kids on a trip every once in awhile, do something they enjoyed in life, and
is india, indonesia, or brazil. there are using a mobile phone to access facebook because they have not had access to the broadband laptop or pc. there isn't a infrastructure like there is in the u.s. people here will say it is good to hear updates from france. in the middle east, facebook provide updates to news and people who have any access to affirmation of and you get a story about what facebook means to them. i -- that is awesome. >> do you notice things that they behave differently like a system? they sure more pictures, less links, or ever want interests the same why? >> one interesting thing is cameras. which is something interesting thing. four billion may have access to a touch screen, a gps, a touch screen that was more powerful than what sentence to space, hopefully for a cheap price. we look at that and we say, all these people are going to have video cameras and cameras in their pockets and they will be able to have a lands and to the world that they can share with us. we look at found as being not just consumption devices but also publishing tools and that is an exciting way
. >>> several stories caught our attention today. photos as well. take a look. in india a little girl holds a stick to balance as she tight-ropes in the streets. children earn a meager living for their families by street prfling. >>> this town was bombed by syrian forces. more than 100,000 syrians have fled to turkey since syria's civil war began just last year. >>> in new zealand prince charles learning how to use a gun used to make carpets. the royal logo is on the one he is working on. it's part of the queen's diamond jubilee float. >>> this is cnn newsroom. new details now on the resignation of former cia director david petraeus. since he admitted to having an extramarital affair, we have learned that the fbi was investigating the general's private emails months ago. that probe led to his rez iing nation. it all started when jill kelly, a friend of general pat yas contacted the fbi about threatening emails she said she received from another woman. that woman seen here was paula broadwell. now, she wrote petraeus's biography and said she used to jog with the general when he was leading t
a slum in mumbai india and finally anne applebaum has been nominated for iron curtain. that book is just out and she is scheduled to appear under q&a and show in december, so you will be able to see her as well and robert caro will be interviewing those others as we go and we will be watching the red carpet here as some of the authors have their pictures taken that right now we want to talk to the chairman of the national book foundation and this is david steinberger. david steinberger is the head of the perseus book group. if you would, tell us for those who don't know what is the national book award? >> the national book awards are given to the best marketing books in four categories every year so fiction, nonfiction, poetry and literature. it's the pantheon, the greatest american authors, saul bellow, john updike so it's a pretty good big deal to win this award. >> this began 63 years ago? do you know the history when it began or why it began? >> m it was a group of people who are interested in making sure that great looks have the greatest possible impact on the culture and that is s
, india or brazil right now. they're using a mobile phone primarily to access it because they haven't had an access to a broadband p.c. or laptop. there isn't an infrastructure of media that you have in the u.s. so a lot of americans will meet me and say facebook is combreat for gossiping and see what my friends are eating for lunch. but if you were to talk to somebody in the middle east you'd hear a different story which is that facebook was providing access to news to people that had unique access to information that they weren't able to get it otherwise and you get a much more sort of meaty story about what facebook means to them. >> more from facebook engineer chris cox with an insider's view of the company, thanksgiving day on c-span. at 12:00 chief justice john roberts and at 10:ooh, we pay tribute to neil armstrong just before 11:00. >> live coverage here tomorrow on c-span. we'll look at immigration policy at the american enterprise institute. speakers include richard lamb of the sournl baptist convention. that's at sock a.m. eastern. then the c.e.o. of the new york stock exchange
support to the aussie market. india sensex still on the move now shedding 0.4%. let's also take a look at shares of olam. the agricultural supply chain managers flipped over 10% earlier, but managed to recoup losses ending lower by nearly 8%. the stock was halted earlier this morning after muddy waters questioned its accounting methods. ross, back to you. >> thanks for that. we'll catch you a bit later. you're in europe, we're weight the to the down side by around about 6:4. not mar off the session low. but it comes after good gains yesterday. following strong moves in the u.s., as well. cac 40 down half a percent. weighed town by the moody's downgrade, although expected. and ibex done around 0.4%. french debt market, yields are up to 2.1%. treasuries slightly higher, but still below 6%. ten year bund yields slightly lower. so france is trading with the peripheral in that sense. euro-dollar, 1.2794 is where we stand, dipping slightly on on the back of the french downgrade. dollar-yen 81.26, but the yen has been down at acceseven mont lows. aussie dollar slightly weaker against the u.s.
. india will report second quarter gdp figures. and one of china's oldest software developers king soft will announce it profit results. attendees are arriving at the qe-2 conference center in central london ahead of the presentation of lord justice levinson's report on uk press standards. you can see live shots of the arrivals. the long expected and wide ranging report into the culture practices and ethics of the press will be published at 1:30 p.m. london time. that's about 8:30 in the morning eastern time. it will be laid in both houses of parliament at that time and we'll be live outside the conference center later in the show. also still to come, pension funds seeking fresh investment ideas are turning to the credit market. what it means to retirement next. can i help you? i heard you guys can ship ground for less than the ups store. that's right. i've learned the only way to get a holiday deal is to camp out. you know we've been open all night. is this a trick to get my spot? [ male announcer ] break from the holiday stress. save on grounipping at fedex office. >>> welcome back. r
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